Motorist: Safety Measures when Sharing the Road with Bicyclist

In the U.S., bicycles are considered vehicles, and hold the same rights on the roadways as motor vehicles do. However, because bicycles are much smaller, slower and difficult to see, motorists must take extra safety measures when sharing the road with bicyclists.

Yield Right of Way

When approaching an intersection, yield the same right of way to bicycles as you would a vehicle. According to SmartMotorist.com, approximately one in three accidents involving bicycles occur when motorists fail to yield the right of way to bicycles by either making a left turn in front of an oncoming bicycle, or pulling out from a stop sign in front of a bicycle. Always look for bicycles at intersections, and be prepared to wait for a bicyclist to pass before you proceed.

Avoid Hazards

Many motorist-bicyclist accidents are avoidable by simply being aware of potential hazards. For example, although both motorists and bicyclists must obey posted speed limit signs, it is a good idea to lower your speed when approaching a bicyclist on the road. Similarly, motorists should give bicyclists plenty of space to ride, as well as anticipate potential hazards to both themselves and bicyclists. Also, be careful to follow bicyclists at a safe distance — especially during dangerous weather.

Considerations

Bicyclists are equally responsible for safety when riding on public roadways, although not all bicyclists are skilled in riding safety. For example, professional riders are much more likely to understand and adhere to traffic laws and safety precautions than leisurely cyclists and young children. Though you should be careful around all bicyclists, be especially cautious around young children and riders who may be distracted by other riders cycling with them. Doing so may not only prevent a serious accident or injury, but it could save a life too.

Registering a Vehicle in New York

Registering a Vehicle in New YorkResidents of the state of New York who own and operate a motor vehicle are required by state law to register this vehicle with the New York Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). This law applies to all types of vehicles, including new and used cars, whether purchased from an individual or a dealer. Furthermore, new residents of the state who have their vehicle registered in another state are also required to renew the registration for the vehicle in New York as soon as they move to the state.

If it’s your first time registering your vehicle, you will only be able to register in person at the DMV. However, individuals who are renewing their registration can do so online, by mail or by telephone, in addition to the standard option of registering in person. New residents have up to 30 days after their arrival to officially register their motor vehicles.

For first-time registrations, vehicle owners must act upon the following:

  1. Provide proof of insurance. Note that your insurance must be from a New York auto insurance company. Auto insurance policies from any other state are invalid.
  2. Compile required paperwork. If your vehicle was purchased from a dealership, the dealer should have already sent the required paperwork to the DMV. If you did not purchase your vehicle from a dealership, you will be responsible for providing proof of ownership and Form MV-103 (only for vehicles purchased before December 1994).
  3. Complete an application for registration form.
  4. Provide proof of sales tax paid on the vehicle and proof that your vehicle meets the state-mandated emission standard.
  5. Have proof of identity on hand.

Registration fees will vary depending on a few different factors, including the weight of your vehicle and requirement of specialized license tags. Keep in mind that an initial registration fee will be a higher cost than a renewal. Registering a motorcycle has similar guidelines as those for registering a standard automobile; however, motorcycles are registered for one year only and all must be renewed on April 30th.