The Facts on Cell Phone Auto Accident Dangers

Now more than ever, people are relying on their cell phones and smart phone devices for everything. Not only can you talk on the phone, you can text, play games and even use them as GPS devices so you do not get lost. Unfortunately, even though they are useful for so many things, they can be dangerous when you use them improperly. For instance, when you are driving, it is horribly dangerous to use your cell phone. Learn more about the dangers of using your cell phone while you are driving, and why you should make certain you do not engage in this risky behavior.

First, the facts (as reported by Nationwide auto insurance):

  • The top issue that causes driver inattention is operating a mobile device.
  • Drivers who use their cell phones in the car are more likely by up to four times to cause an injury-causing accident.
  • Drivers that operate a car while distracted are cited as a problem around one fourth of crashes.
  • Operating a car while using a mobile phone will reduce the brain activity involved in driving by over one third.

Once you understand these facts, it makes it clear that driving while you use a cell phone or smartphone is not a wise decision. In fact, many states have enacted laws that make texting, checking email and other particular activities illegal.

If you need to use your phone while you are driving, it is recommended that you pull over and take care of business, so that you do not risk your own life and those of others. This is important even when you are trying to do something like using a GPS device through a smart phone.

There are some ways that you can more safely operate your phone while driving. The use of a Bluetooth device will allow you to talk on the phone during your commute without using your hands. These hands-free devices are a great way to have more productivity during your drives without risking your safety.

As you can see, driving while using a phone is not a wise decision. Make sure you spend some time learning the laws in your particular area so that you do not risk breaking the law or your own safety. Make a pledge to not use the phone while you are driving, and you are making a real difference in the world.

Can I Own a Home Without Homeowners Insurance?

Homeowners insurance is designed to protect your house (the physical structure,) and your property. Under some circumstances, there is no law or other requirement to force a homeowner to purchase homeowners insurance in order to own a home. Many people who own older homes don’t insure the home, but if you don’t purchase homeowners insurance, you could lose everything, and be forced to face financial destitution. There are circumstances under which you absolutely have to purchase homeowners insurance in order to complete the transaction for the purchase of the home. Who Doesn’t Have to Have Homeowners Insurance? If you are building or buying a home and don’t need a mortgage to pay for the home, you won’t be forced to purchase homeowners insurance. In a case like this, if you don’t purchase homeowners insurance, any catastrophe could wipe out all of the equity you had in the home, and you would be left without the finances to either repair or replace your property. You would lose everything. When Purchasing a Condo If you buy a condo, the physical structure is insured under the property owner’s insurance. If you pay for the condo in full, and don’t need to borrow the money to finance the purchase, you don’t have to purchase homeowners insurance, but without doing so, you have no protection for any of your personal property. This is another situation where you could face financial ruin. Mortgages to Buy or Build a Home or Condo If you borrow money in the form of a mortgage, whether to build a new home, or to purchase an existing one, the lender will demand proof that you have a homeowner’s insurance policy. Unless you can bring your lender a copy of the policy as proof that the home is insured, none of the papers that finalize the mortgage can go through. You will also be required to include the lender as a co-beneficiary on the policy. The reason for this is to provide the lender with the assurance that if the home is destroyed by something that is specifically covered by the policy, the lender will recoup their money as soon as the insurance company issues a check that is made out to both you and the lender. Since the check is made out to two beneficiaries (you and the lender,) you won’t be able to cash the check without the lender’s signature. The insurance money is supposed to cover whatever is still owed on the mortgage. If the amount of the check is for more than what you still owe on the mortgage, the extra money goes to you. Homeowners insurance isn’t that different than health insurance. In both cases, you are paying to insure something of great value (yourself, your family members, or your home and property,) in case of something catastrophic. Without the homeowners insurance, you could be totally wiped out financially, without resources to rebuild your destroyed home, or repair any damage. Since you also insure the contents of the home, homeowners insurance provides you with the assurance and peace of mind that you will be able to get enough money to replace lost possessions – as long as you insure your property for replacement as opposed to actual value.)

Is Your Auto Insurer on Strong Financial Legs?

Strong Foundation with Right InsuranceIt’s not enough to pick an auto insurer on the strength of their online car insurance quotes. Sure, this is a great way to gauge whether or not you’re going to be able to afford insurance for that fancy SUV you just got for a steal. But when it comes to the point of saying “Yes, I’ll go with this company” you’ve got to look beyond just comparing auto insurance quotes. What you really need to look at is the financial strength of the insurer.

What does the financial strength of the insurance company you’re doing business with have to do with it? Everything. Picture this scenario: two days after someone decides to make your day by t-boning you in an intersection, your car insurance company files for bankruptcy. Talk about your bad timing – in this circumstance you’ll be lucky to get a payout on your claim. But a company doesn’t have to be going under to experience difficulty coming up with the money to pay out.

For this reason, never just base your decision on their online car insurance quotes. Always make sure that the company you’re thinking of doing business with has the financial standing to be able to fork over the funds if and when the time comes. You can do this by using the online services of A.M. Best, an organization that ranks the financial strength of insurance companies. If an insurer receives any of the following 3 ratings, you can consider them a safe bet.

• Superior – A++ or A+ rating.
• Excellent – A or A- rating.
• Good – B++ or B+ rating.

If the insurance company has a rating any lower than this, you might be putting yourself at risk for not getting coverage when you need it the most.

Some Facts About Condo Insurance

Condo owners have benefits that aren’t shared by the average homeowner, in particular freedom from having to care for landscaping and being able to benefit from security services provided by their condominium association. However many condo dwellers question whether or not they should pay extra for private condo insurance coverage. Many are under the false assumption that insurance coverage is provided by the condo association, but this isn’t always the case. To find out whetFacts - Good to Knowher or not you’re a candidate for a supplemental condo insurance policy, read on.

Misconceptions About your Master Insurance Policy
If you live in a condo, you probably pay monthly dues that go towards what’s called a “master insurance policy.” But don’t mistake this for an insurance policy that’ll cover you in the event of damage to your personal property. Your condo’s master insurance policy only goes so far as to cover the following.

  • Damage to common property that all residents in your association use. This means that if the pool clubhouse is damaged in a fire, the master insurance policy will pay for it. However you won’t be covered if you burn your kitchen down trying out a new recipe.
  • Personal injuries that occur in common areas. If someone slips and hurts themselves in the parking lot, the association will pay for this. But if you or a guest slips and breaks a bone while trying to put out the fire in your kitchen, you’ll be responsible for covering the medical damages.
  • Burglary and vandalism to common areas. As with everything else that’s covered by the condo’s master insurance policy, only common property items that are stolen or vandalized are covered. If someone breaks into your condo and takes you for everything you’re worth, this isn’t covered.

Supplemental condo insurance coverage isn’t required, but strongly recommended if you want to safeguard your personal property and ensure adequate protection against bodily injury.

Home Insurance Tips: Make an Inventory

Insurance Tips for YouMost of us would be hard pressed to remember what we had for breakfast yesterday, much less recite the entire contents of our homes from memory—or declare each item’s monetary value and when we purchased it. But believe it or not, this is a standard requirement of home insurance policies if you have to claim major losses due to a fire, burglary, or some other covered event. Not all homeowner policies will require you to pony up with serial numbers and receipts, but you will have to provide as much detail as possible. Here are a few tips to help you prepare for that.

  • Make a home inventory. If there was ever a daunting task, this is it. But it can be done, especially if you lay your focus only on high priced items or irreplaceable belongings like family heirlooms. Take a single room at a time and write everything down including makes, models, serial numbers, dimensions and monetary value.
  • Save your receipts. This doesn’t mean you have to store a paper record of every DVD or carton of eggs you buy, but it does mean that you should keep receipts for every high ticket item you buy in a safe place.
  • Find a safe place. This ties in directly with saving your receipts and making a home inventory. If you don’t store this information someplace where it’s likely to stay out of harm’s way, you could end up losing this as well. Consider investing in a fire-proof safe, obtaining a safety deposit box, or even uploading soft copies of everything to an online storage server that’ll remain accessible to you even if your entire home is destroyed.